Promotion of knives in supermarkets leads to dozens of ACC complaints

More than 1.2 million knives were distributed by New World during the three-month campaign that began in November of last year.

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More than 1.2 million knives were distributed by New World during the three-month campaign that began in November of last year.

ACC figures indicate that there have been more than 80 claims for accidents caused by Smeg knives donated during a hugely popular supermarket promotion.

More than 1.2 million knives were distributed by New World during the three-month campaign that began in November of last year.

Stickers were given based on the amount spent by people in the supermarket that could be redeemed for the products.

People have begged for tokens on social media, they’ve been peddled on TradeMe, and there have been complaints to the Trade Commission from those who messed up when the supermarket ran out of stock and the promotion has ended.

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There have also been numerous reports of people cutting themselves on the knives, which came out of the box sharp.

ACC figures show there have been over 13,000 knife-related injury claims so far this year. They were around 19,000 each year in 2018, 2019 and 2020.

On average over the past three years, there have been around 11,750 complaints per year by men compared to around 7,500 by women.

Antoinette Laird, Foodstuffs NZ Business Manager, said people know quality knives are sharp and encouraged all customers to use all sharp objects properly and safely.

ACC injury prevention manager Kirsten Malpas said the number of knife injuries could be reduced by more people taking a break.

“About 90 percent of injuries are preventable. Slow down and take a moment to assess the risks,” she said.

“If you can see it coming, you can prevent it from happening. Do a ‘hmm’ and decide if there’s a safer way to do it.”

The information comes from researching ACC accident description forms for the words “Smeg” and “Knife Promotion,” and the variability in the details provided by claimants means the data is not definitive.

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